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Zen Stories
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 1776
Location: in ma bear cave

PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2008 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

#93

Quote:
Storyteller's Zen

Encho was a famous storyteller. His tales of love stirred the hearts of his listeners. When he narrated a story of war, it was as if the listeners themselves were in the field of battle.

One day Encho met Yamaoka Tesshu, a layman who had almost embraced masterhood of Zen. "I understand," said Yamaoka, "you ar the best storyteller in out land and that you make people cry or laugh at will. Tell me my favorite story of the Peach Boy. When I was a little tot I used to sleep beside my mother, and she often related this legend. In the middle of the story I would fall asleep. Tell it to me just as my mother did."

Encho dared not attempt this. He requested time to study. Several months later he went to Yamaoka and said: "Please give me the opportunity to tell you the story."

"Some other day," answered Yamaoka.

Encho was keenly disappointed. He studied further and tried again. Yamaoka rejected him many times. When Encho would start to talk Yamaoka would stop him, saying: "You are not yet like my mother."

It took Encho five years to be able to tell Yamaoka the legend as his mother had told it to him.

In this way, Yamaoka imparted Zen to Encho.


#94

Quote:
Midnight Excursion

Many pupils were studying meditation under the Zen master Sengai. One of them used to arise at night, climb over the temple wall, and go to town on a pleasure jaunt.

Sengai, inspecting the dormitory quarters, found this pupil missing one night and also discovered the high stool he had used to scale the wall. Sengai removed the stool and stood there in its place.

When the wanderer returned, not knowing that Sengai was the stool, he put his feet on the master's head and jumped down into the grounds. Discovering what he had done, he was aghast.

Sengai said: "It is very chilly in the early morning. Do be careful not to catch cold yourself."

The pupil never went out at night again.

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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 1776
Location: in ma bear cave

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

#95

Quote:
A Letter to a Dying Man

Bassui wrote the following letter to one of his disciples who was about to die:

"The essence of your mind is not born, so it will never die. It is not an existance, which is perishable. It is not an emptiness, which is a mere void. It has neither color nor form. It enjoys no pleasures and suffers no pains.

"I know you are very ill. Like a good Zen student, you are facing that sickness squarely. You may not know exactly who is suffering, but question yourself: What is the essence of this mind? Think only of this. You will need no more. Covet nothing. Your end which is endless is as a snowflake dissolving in the pure air."


#96

Quote:
A Drop of Water

A Zen master named Gisan asked a young student to bring him a pail of water to cool his bath.

The student brought the water and, after cooling the bath, threw on to the ground the little that was left over.

"You dunce!" the master scolded him. "Why didn't you give the rest of the water to the plants? What right have you to waste even one drop of water in this temple?"

The young student attained Zen in that instant. He changed his name to Tekisui, which means a drop of water.

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Rexfelum



Joined: 26 Sep 2003
Posts: 3897

PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wargh, I haven't posted in a while. I wanted to comment on some you posted a few entries above.

To start:

Quote:
Midnight Excursion

Isn't this exactly the same as others in this collection? For instance . . .

Quote:
Sleeping in the Daytime, p. 3 of thread

. . . is basically identical. With that in mind, wasn't there something that sounded like . . .

Quote:
Right and Wrong, also p. 3 of thread

. . . recently? I really liked that one (i.e., the one on p. 3).

Next:

Quote:
The Last Rap

I found this amusing. When I went to comment on it, I realized that . . .

Quote:
Zen Dialogue

. . . and . . .

Quote:
The Taste of Banzo's Sword

. . . had plenty of nice features to them, too. But for the "Dialogue," though I found it amusing also, I'm not actually sure how it is supposed to reveal anything other than coincidence. Was the other student attempting to impart zen? The story seems unhelpful.

--Rexfelum
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indeed, I too have found some of them to be perplexing, or even shallow in nature. Also, as for repeating themes, to me it almost feels like identical problems on a test worded differently. Alas, I myself have much to learn, and am only the middleman in presenting them to you, so there's not much I can say...

However, I can post more.

#97

Quote:
Teaching the Ultimate

In early times in Japan, bamboo-and-paper lanterns were used with candles inside. A blind man, visiting a friend one night, was offered a lantern to carry home with him.

"I do not need a lantern," he said. "Darkness or light is all the same to me."

"I know you do not need a lantern to find your way," his friend replied, "but if you don't have one, someone else may run into you. So you must take it."

The blind man started off with the lantern and before he had walked very far someone ran squarely into him. "Look out where you are going!" he exclaimed to the stranger. "Can't you see this lantern?"

"Your candle has burned out, brother," replied the stranger.


#98

Quote:
Non-Attachment

Kitano Gempo, abbot of Eihei temple, was ninety-two years old when he passed away in the year 1933. He endeavored his whole life not to be attached to anything. As a wandering mendicant when he was twenty he happened to meet a traveler who smoked tobacco. As they walked together down a mountain road, they stopped under a tree to rest. The traveler offered Kitano a smoke, which he accepted, as he was very hungry at the time.

"How pleasant this smoking is," he commented. The other gave him an extra pipe and tobacco and they parted.

Kitano felt: "Such pleasant things may disturb meditation. Before this goes too far, I will stop now." So he threw the smoking outfit away.

When he was twenty-three years old he studied I-King, the profoundest doctrine of the universe. It was winter at the time and he needed some heavy clothes. He wrote his teacher, who lived a hundred miles away, telling him of his need, and gave the letter to a traveler to deliver. Almost the whole winter passed and neither answer nor clothes arrived. So Kitano resorted to the prescience of I-King, which also teaches the art of divination, to determine whether or not his letter had miscarried. He found that this had been the case. A letter afterwards from his teacher made no mention of clothes.

"If I perform such accurate determinative work with I-King, I may neglect my meditation," felt Kitano. So he gave up this marvelous teaching and never resorted to its powers again.

When he was twenty-eight he studied Chinese calligraphy and poetry. He grew so skillful in these arts that his teacher praised him. Kitano mused: "If I don't stop now, I'll be a poet, not a Zen teacher." So he never wrote another poem.

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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 02, 2008 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

#99

Quote:
Tosui's Vinegar

Tosui was the Zen master who left the formalism of temples to live under a bridge with beggars. When he was getting very old, a friend helped him to earn his living without begging. He showed Tosui how to collect rice and manufacture vinegar from it, and Tosui did this until he passed away.

While Tosui was making vinegar, one of the beggars gave him a picture of the Buddha. Tosui hung it on the wall of his hut and put a sign beside it. The sign read:

Mr. Amida Buddha: This little room is quite narrow. I can let you remain as a transient. But don't think I am asking you to be reborn in your paradise.


Wow, we're almost at the end.
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Infinite Blue, Quack M.D.



Joined: 09 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a shame. I really like these stories.
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I think I'll compliment IB in Bork, Bork, Borkian...

Ze sveedish chef: eenfuneet bluoo ees ell ebuoot keyewtneuoeuoeus BORK BORK BORK!!!
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Rexfelum



Joined: 26 Sep 2003
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 02, 2008 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, yup.

--Rexfelum
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

#100

Quote:
The Silent Temple

Shoichi was a one-eyed teacher of Zen, sparkling with enlightenment. He taught his disciples in Tofuku temple.

Day and night the whole temple stood in silence. There was no sound at all.

Even the reciting of sutras was abolished by the teacher. His pupils had nothing to do but meditate.

When the master passed away, an old neighbor heard the ringing of bells and the recitation of sutras. Then she knew Shoichi had gone.


Just one more to go...
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:17 am    Post subject: The Last One Reply with quote

Number one hundred and one:

Quote:
Buddha's Zen

Buddha said: "I consider the positions of kings and rulers as that of dust motes. I observe treasures of gold and gems as so many bricks and pebbles. I look upon the finest silken robes as tattered rags. I see myriad worlds of the universe as small seeds of fruit, and the greatest lake in India as a drop of oil on my foot. I perceive the teachings of the world to be the illusion of magicians. I discern the highest conception of emancipation as a golden brocade in a dream, and view the holy path of the illuminated ones as flowers appearing in one's eyes. I see meditation as a pillar of a mountain, Nirvana as a nightmare of daytime. I look upon the judgment of right and wrong as the serpentine dance of a dragon, and the rise and fall of beliefs as but traces left by the four seasons."


And, that's all there is.

DISCUSS!
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Darius



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Posts: 430

PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's strange to realize that this topic began two and a half years ago, when surely everyone here was a different person. I know I felt like I was in a different life. To keep up the effort for all this time is truly a commendable feat, DarkOtaku.

It's also strange because, with the age of this topic, I've surely read it all, but it doesn't FEEL like I have.
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Day before yesterday I saw a rabbit, and yesterday a deer, and today, you.
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm thinking of continuing to post stories, they just won't be part of that compilation.

If anyone else has anything to post, please feel free to. I'm going to attempt to scrape the proverbial barrel of zen.
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Rexfelum



Joined: 26 Sep 2003
Posts: 3897

PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've thought a bunch about these stories, and I am glad to have read them. There is a book back in my family's house (I don't know which person bought it) called The Japanese Tea Ceremony, which I enjoyed perusing for the wonderful way of speaking and little bits of wisdom. I felt somewhat the same reading what you posted over this time.

Here is one bit that I felt obliged to write down and keep:

Julia V. Nakamura wrote:
There is the dialogue between Shoshi, the Taoist, and his friend as they walked along the bank of the river.
Said Shoshi: "How delightfully the fishes are enjoying themselves in the warm water!"
"You are not a fish; how do you know that the fishes are enjoying themselves?"
And Shoshi said: "You are not myself, how do you know that I do not know that the fishes are enjoying themselves?"

I posted this as my signature line or some such previously.

--Rexfelum
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Bearses



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2011 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

and now, some AI Koans...

counting combeferre's submission, this will be #2:

Quote:
Moon instructs a student

One day a student came to Moon and said: I understand how to make a better garbage collector. We must keep a reference count of the pointers to each cons.

Moon patiently told the student the following story:

One day a student came to Moon and said: I understand how to make a better garbage collector...

[Ed. note: Pure reference-count garbage collectors have problems with circular structures that point to themselves.]

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