Broken Saints Forum Index Broken Saints
Forums
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

New DVD reviews
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Broken Saints Forum Index -> We Haven't Slept in Lifetimes...and our 1000 Eyes are Burning.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 8:06 pm    Post subject: New DVD reviews Reply with quote

Figured I might as well start this thread with a positive vibe, as I'm sure there'll be countless haters out there

This just went up on IGN-wannabe entertainment hub UGO:

Quote:
BROKEN SAINTS DVD REVIEW

It's rare, but every once in a while a DVD set will come completely out of nowhere to show us what the medium is truly capable of accomplishing and make most of the other DVDs we review pale in comparison. Broken Saints is one of those rare DVDs. For most people, DVD is still just a tool for them to be able to watch their favorite movies or TV shows again and again. Most people haven't even listened to a commentary track or watched a featurette about the making of the movies they've chosen to add to their collection, but most people also probably won't be interested in something like Broken Saints, because it won't get prominent new release placement at the local video store and they won't have heard of it from a national theatrical run. Well, they won't be interested until they see it and know what they've been missing. Broken Saints is an epic DVD that uses its medium to the fullest, presenting a great story with perfect picture and sound and enough extras to keep even the most hardcore fan satisfied.

Broken Saints began life as a flash presentation on Switch Interactive. In a series of installments, writer Brooke Burgess and a team of dedicated technical professionals created what could be called an animated graphic novel. The characters don't move like we're used to in anime or Disney with largely-still, beautifully drawn characters that the "camera" closes up on or pans out from with word bubbles that tell the story - like a comic book. It's a visually stunning combination of what we've come to expect from graphic novels, anime, DVD comics and feature films. Broken Saints uses this format to tell a 700-minute story over four DVDs, broken up into chapters. In this fascinating tale, four strangers from different corners of the globe have terrifying visions of the future and must come together to figure out if they're the world's salvation or maybe its undoing. In this set, voice actors like William B. Davis (Cigarette-Smoking Man from The X-Files), Scott McNeil and David Kaye add human voice to what was previously just written on a flash screen.

By the very nature of its production and presentation, Broken Saints is a visual and auditory experience and its creators know that. The first disc in the set comes with an optimizer that will help you adjust the picture to the right color levels and test your surround sound system. That's how much they care about picture and sound. Even without the optimizer, the picture and sound on Broken Saints is nothing short of amazing and becomes an essential part of the experience. Where most films and TV shows point and shoot and the soundtrack is an afterthought, Broken Saints relies on its imagery and its score and effects to work. Turn off all of the lights. Turn up the volume. Sit close to your widescreen TV. With nary a flaw, Broken Saints will suck you in just on a technological level, and once you're there having the sensory experience, maybe your brain will be inspired by the tale Brooke Burgess and his team has to tell.

If you're already a Broken Saints fan, look out for the extras that Fox has assembled. The entire series comes with an audio track from the creators of Broken Saints and that would be enough to warrant purchase from most fans of the landmark flash creation, but there's a ton more extras including dozens of behind-the-scenes featurettes, documentaries, interviews, fan films, easter eggs and even a preview for the upcoming Broken Saints video game. Yes, Broken Saints has built enough of a following that it has fan films and a video game on the horizon. Since its debut in 2001, more people have latched on to the Broken Saints phenomenon every year and it's a cult that shows no signs of slowing down.

You can add this fan to that list. We often know what to expect when DVDs of theatrical hits come down the release list or when current TV shows get the home theater treatment, but a few times a year something smacks the DVD market upside its head, showing it how much can be done on not just a technical or special features level but through storytelling as well. Broken Saints merges the potential of the internet, the potential of DVD, and the potential of the human mind into something that has to be seen to be believed. See it.

Review by Brian Tallerico

Show: A
Look: A
Sound: A
Extras: A
Overall: A



Add yours as you find 'em!
_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the sake of balance, here's a hater...but at least he digs the discs themselves

Quote:
Comic book films certainly have proved to be a profitable enterprise dating back to the 60ís, the 50ís, even the 40ís and while many adaptations have served their comic counterparts well, none of them have really quite captured the complete tone and narrative of their comic brothers. For example, Batman Begins comes close to certain styles and narrative tone, but greatly differs from the Batman of the 80ís or the campy 60ís. Same goes for Spider-man and Superman. Both have seen darker and lighter days, as well as dozens of different drawing styles.

The main reason for this deviation is that the style of the films, however close it may be, lacks the panel-by-panel narrative given to each and every comic book on the market today. This is where Broken Saints comes in. The story is told through those panels using comic book art and word bubble dialogue and narration. The panels are then animated to create a sense of style, tone and movement though limited it may be. The result is a mesmerizing, wholly original piece of cinematic art--a new way to adapt comic books and graphic novels.

However, if oneís a videogame player, one will quickly note that this sort of animation style has been used in video games dating all the way back to Commodore 64 and the Nintendo Entertainment System and is still used today on our most popular systems. Itís easy to argue that Broken Saints is nothing more than one long cut scene from a video game, however, the medium has never been used the way itís being used here.

Unfortunately, despite all the originality in the style of the narrative, Broken Saints is nothing more than a pretentious, often boring, clichťd mishmash of cult flicks like Donnie Darko, The Matrix, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and A Clockwork Orange, with a dash of Christian and other religious ideology as well as quirky political conspiracy theory. Some may be drawn to this sort of narrative, but for anyone whoís experienced the above films, Broken Saints will feel a bit flat and, in the end, a bit unfulfilling.

The story is told using a sweeping poetic tone thatís irritating and confusing. Sure, this lends to the mystery of the story, which involves four possible saviors, the apocalypse and an evil corporate enterprise, but why must each line of dialogue feel so artificial and fake? Itís like listening to a canned pop group like Coldplay. The lyrics are interesting, but shallow and trite upon further listening. Of course, the intricate plot does manage to formulate into a stricter narrative the longer you watch it, but by the stories end, youíll have wished the creators trimmed an hour...or five.

The style is certainly interesting and I canít wait to see what the Broken Saints folks do next, but Broken Saints is nothing more than a pretentious, ultra elaborate comic book homage to great films that we already know and love. Itís worth a look, but donít get sucked in. Youíll be disappointed by the stories finale.

*Film Scorecard*
As entertainment: * *
As a film: * *
As a piece of art: * * * Ĺ

Overall:

2 Stars



DVD REVIEW:

Video:

Presented in Anamorphic Widescreen 1:66:1, Broken Saints looks pretty good considering its source: an internet flash movie. There are some digital grain issues and often the art is a bit warm and faded (likely an animation choice). This is easily the best these videos will ever look. Fans are sure to be pleased.

Audio:

Presented in Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, this is a lively track with surround heavy effects. Itís a great listen, one to share with others. A voiceless stereo track is also included. Apparently, this is the way they were featured on the internet site. Fans, again, are sure to be pleased about this inclusion.

English, Spanish and French subtitles are also included.

Extras:

Fox has culled together a massive amount of material for this excellent four disc boxset.

Each of the 24 episodes contains an audio commentary from the series creators. Everyone seems to be aware of how confusing their series is which was refreshing to hear. Just about anything you could possibly want to know is discussed in this massive batch of impressive and insightful commentaries.

Disc one features a short documentary, a featurette, several panel discussion, trailers and interviews.

Disc two features more discussions and almost an hour of interviews culled from around the globe.

Disc three features a slew of very funny fans films, several DVD-Rom features and an interesting interactive Tarot game.

Disc four features a fairly info-heavy documentary along with a featurette, interviews, a slideshow and the first chapter of the story as it was originally presented.

Final Thoughts:

Again, if youíre a fan of this series, pick this awesome boxset up. The picture is great, the sound is top notch and the special features are impressive, to say the least. Newcomers may want to check out this series on the web first and see if they like it. Itís not for everyoneís taste, but animation fans and graphic novel fans are sure to enjoy the mood and style of the series.

*DVD Scorecard*
Video: 8.5
Audio: 9.5
Extras: 10
Overall Value: 9

_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
XuShenLi



Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Posts: 1616
Location: West Lafayette, Indiana

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meh, different strokes for different folks.

Brooke, what's with your avatar? Where did you get it from?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twin peaks, baby....TWIN FRICKIN' PEAKS!!!!


_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
detonathor



Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a negative review from Collider.com

Quote:
Review by Chris Kallemeyn

Based on a web-based flash-animated series, Broken Saints uses a limited style of animation featuring static images that drift back and forth, while the camera slowly pans or zooms to reveal the various narrative elements. While this is not the first time I've seen this style, it has been used in great success with documentaries like The Kid Stays In The Picture and In The Realms of The Unreal, both of which make use of this unique visual approach to animating still images. But this was the first time I've ever seen this so-called 'cinematic literature' to tell an entire story. Unfortunately, this new experience was difficult for me to appreciate the graphic images, and more importantly following the plot suffers from the frustrating slow pacing and awkward editing style.



The four main characters are from different parts of the globe, each with their own cultural baggage; A white woman shipwrecked as a child and raised on the south pacific island of Fiji, an extremely paranoid computer programmer who hacks into corporate networks, an Iraqi solder that suffers from haunting visions which causes him to violently attack his phantasms, and finally a Zen Buddhist monk that only seems to experience delusional hallucinations when he meditates. The obsession with mistrust and Big Brother is the central theme where the main characters may be paranoid, but that doesn't mean that somebody isn't out to get them. Unlike The X-files or Dr Strangelove that pokes fun at paranoia, this series wants us to take this stuff way too seriously. Maybe the filmmakers smoked too much pot before writing this story, but it seems to me that these characters would actually benefit from some serious psychotherapy. We the viewer become irresistibility sucked into a sinister plot involving a lost orphan waif, mind-controlling global satellites and evil bio-corporations that contaminate our precious bodily fluids. The characters are forced against their own will to embark on truth-seeking vision quests that are interspersed with philosophical quotes taken from an intro to philosophy class. I could try to continue describing the plot, but it just doesn't seem to matter anymore.



According to the director, the series uses what he calls "long form flash storytelling" where comic book visuals featuring static images along with word balloons and thought boxes that pop-up on screen to accompany the dialogue. This 'flash' animation technology was originally developed for the limitations of HTLM protocol language of the World Wide Web, and this technology works well for the web due to the efficient manner it transmits text and graphics over limited bandwidths. Other than its obvious use with web-based advertising, desk-top computers soon made flash animation popular with do-it-yourself animators who wanted to circumnavigate big media to get their story told. This democratic aspect to flash animation is great for the web's direct distribution approach, but here the filmic semantics suffers terribly when they try to fit a web-based story into the medium of digital video.



The end-result of this effort is more of a big step backwards in terms of the language of film, and the static images, limited animation, text boxes and restricted editing remind me more of a silent films from the 1910's. The lack of any shot-reverse-shot dialog editing was particularly frustrating, especially when you're forced to watch a static image of two characters facing each other while word balloons pop-up for several minutes. The series is divided into a multitude of chapters, roughly ten to twenty minutes in length, so all together, there are over ten hours(!) of this stuff spread over four DVD disks. Eventually I found myself watching the series with my finger locked on the fast-forward button at twice the normal running speed while reading the word balloons. I was still bored.



Now to be fair, there a few good things that fans of flash animation will enjoy, with well-drawn images and impressive multi-layered atmospheric effects that add some spice to the otherwise dull visual pacing. The voice talents are pretty good, and the sound effects are augmented with spooky rumbling filling in for a minimalist musical score. In other words, they had more money for more bling. On an objective level, I realize that this is another emerging technology that has certain limitations that I'm viewing from the context of both comics and filmic semantics. The media theorist Marshall McLuhan speaks of the common tendency for any society to view emerging mediums through the filter of the old (early literature was based on oral storytelling, radio from print, television from film, etc.) so thus this is an idea that is too new for me to fully appreciate. I can remember when comics were 35 cents, so maybe I'm just too old.



Extras



With over five hours of special features, this box set has many expanded tangents radiating out from the four disk DVD. One tangent includes DVD-ROM features that are accessible to both PC and Mac users (Windows 98 SE / Mac OS 9.0 or higher respectively). The audio allows two different approaches to your auditory experience, one may either view the series with the 5.1 Dolby digital surround mix or for the comic purist the series may be viewed with a voiceless stereo track that includes only music and sound effects. As I have already mentioned, every word of dialogue is visually presented in word balloons and thought boxes in English, so the dialog-less audio track is worthless, but the subtitles in Spanish and French can be utilized as a foreign language learning tool, allowing side-by-side comparisons for an instructive culture experience, so who's says comics aren't educational. The featurettes are numerous, so I'll try to be brief: A making-of doc that is actually just the director's home movies, a Q&A seminar with the director as he rambles about his epiphanies while his eyes never blink, an interactive 'Tarot Tree' that explains all the characters, a second making-of doc that is much better produced, a completely worthless Sundance doc, and finally a glimpse of the original visual style from the web version. Last of all are the audio commentaries from the creators featured throughout the entire series that include many more conspiracy theories that the filmmakers were unable to add to the series' plot.



Final Words



With one foot in the comicís medium and one foot in the web medium, this series quickly gained a loyal following on the internet for its edgy conspiracies and metaphysical musings. This was my first introduction to the series, and I found the whole experience slow, tedious and boring. I just couldn't accept the plot seriously, and I found myself laughing at the wrong moments when I was should have been scared. Visually, the limited flash animation effect was poorly used here when I would have been happier to see the story condensed to a two hour fully animated film.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Luckily, IMDB's traffic slaughters punks like Collider BWAHAHAHAHAH

Quote:
Broken Saints
(Buy Widescreen)
The ambitious and impressive 10-hour-plus animated epic by former video game developer Brooke Burgess, a unique combination of graphic novel and flash animation serial, was shown on the internet in 24 installments over the course of three years. The story follows the physical and spiritual odysseys of four strangers from all over the globe who are struck with apocalyptic visions and drawn to a dark city where the discover their intertwined fates and join forces to confront a global conspiracy. The subdued but rich style is unusually expressive and intimate, favoring mood and introspection to spectacle. The entire epic is collected in a deluxe 4-disc set, though like the original Internet series it is best seen in small chapters than as a single feature.

_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the editorial staff at AMAZON.ca

Quote:
Amazon.ca
A remarkable achievement and thoroughly engrossing, Broken Saints: The Animated Comic Special is the complete 12-hour adventure series (in 24 chapters) originally posted online between 2001 and 2003. A combination of comic book graphics and Flash animation, Broken Saints features characters that don't move (as in a comic book) but exist in scenes that suggest flowing action simply by introducing additional images or shifting a background (thanks to Flash). Dialogue is rendered via conventional speech balloons, but for this DVD set, actors (including William B. Davis, the "Cigarette Smoking Man" from The X-Files) have been cast to provide voices for the characters, giving the story greater immediacy. Also new is a music score, featuring some muscular rock as well as Mozart. Loads of special features are included, too.

Created by Brooke Burgess, Ian Kirby, and Andrew West, Broken Saints is the complex tale of an unlikely alliance between four individuals from very different walks of life. Shandala is a mysterious, 18-year-old woman from an uncharted Fijian island, altruistic and innocent yet possessed of terrifying powers. Raimi is a young, Canadian developer of security software who encounters a powerful force online and believes something big is about to take place on the planet. Oran is a Muslim from Baghdad who goes temporarily mad while guarding a bunker alone. Kamimura is an elderly, Shinto mystic from Japan estranged from his former Buddhist order. The quartet is connected through common visions of dark forces about to be unleashed, though they also learn quite a bit about themselves and each other during their perilous mission. Watching this series from beginning to end is a special and unique experience. As the story progresses, the makers of Broken Saints get better and better at their mixed-media technology, and the results are often beautiful and profound. --Tom Keogh

_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
detonathor



Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah well, no need to quote it.
http://dvd.ign.com/articles/723/723526p1.html

Speaking of Kevin Smith, a discussion here:
http://www.chud.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93368
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah...he was brutal AND personal.

And yet we still got an Editor's Award

Man...some people just love to hate me.



b
_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
Saggio l'uno



Joined: 22 Apr 2002
Posts: 6075
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 8:23 pm    Post subject: Or maybe I didn't. Reply with quote

I'm just wondering why Andrew West or Ian Kirby aren't mentioned by name in any of the reviews that I've ever read for either this DVD or the last one. It just seems to be "Brooke Burgess and associated little people."

No offense, or anything. I just found that kind of odd.
_________________
Philosophy is the art of preparing for death.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are actually quite a few great indy reviews (like DVD Toons, CHUD, Exclaim, etc) that go into more detail...but overall, this is how Fox pitched it based on all the material we gave them.

Why do you think we got NO interviews at Comicon?

Because Fox couldn't create the story hooks necessary to snare major outlets, and rarely provided ample information from our original presskits.

As for press on the previous DVD, I approached many story editors after the fact - when they clearly missed team members, accomplishments, or contributors - and most of them just used the excuse that they're film/media outlets, and therefore they focus on writing/directing/production.

Andrew and Ian (and Tobias, and others) have been understandably frustrated with this on more than one occasion...sadly, there's nothing I can do other than mention them glowingly and ad infinitum in every interview I do (which I ALWAYS do).

Editors shape the story that they want to see...the IGN piece alone should be proof of that

b
_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
Scapes



Joined: 09 Feb 2003
Posts: 696
Location: San Francisco, CA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gwen Stefani Syndrome? One can't control who the mindless media opts to highlight as the source of a piece of art. Brooke said it best, they shape stories as they feel will be best received by the masses while still inputting opinion. Unfortunately, this often means they can't be arsed to credit those deserving it. Efforts to share the light can be made (one of the No Doubt videos actually addressed Stefani's capturing all the media attention while the band was largely ignored) but ultimately it's in the hands of the news merchants.

However, unlike Stefani, Brooke doesn't plan to bestow the title of ambassador of Japanese culture upon himself.
-- Scaper-X
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Emperor Xan



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 4075
Location: A boat.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Editors are at once the greatest force of good and evil in the publishing world. They giveth you shit and taketh none for they are gods and you are but mortals. At least, that's how it seems since even if you ignore a revision or point out the cruciality of a scene, they'll gut it anyway if they think it's "best" for the project by allowing the general public to enjoy your "vision." They "know best," after all.
_________________
Greatest quote eva:
Vertigo21 wrote:
Make...something?

Shit man, I can barely make a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich. I can't make a watch.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Rexfelum



Joined: 26 Sep 2003
Posts: 3897

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Emperor Xan wrote:
Editors

Did you see this when I linked it in another thread and mentioned you by name?



--Rexfelum
_________________
"May your deity of choice follow you with anchovies." --Terry Pratchett.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Emperor Xan



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 4075
Location: A boat.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL...no missed that one. Might have been at the height of the project notetaking/writing phase.
_________________
Greatest quote eva:
Vertigo21 wrote:
Make...something?

Shit man, I can barely make a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich. I can't make a watch.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
detonathor



Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another negative. Mostly plot description...
http://www.reeltalkreviews.com/browse/viewitem.asp?type=review&id=1801
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bs



Joined: 20 Oct 2001
Posts: 2341
Location: Not there...THERE!

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man D - you're totally into finding the negative. I've found at least a dozen pretty glowing ones that I just haven't posted yet
_________________
It is flickering
A distant lamp
But I can still see it
Not just another star
It is Me
It is You
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
Emperor Xan



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 4075
Location: A boat.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL, Jennifer just said that the dude needs to jump into a lake.
_________________
Greatest quote eva:
Vertigo21 wrote:
Make...something?

Shit man, I can barely make a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich. I can't make a watch.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
detonathor



Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bs wrote:
Man D - you're totally into finding the negative. I've found at least a dozen pretty glowing ones that I just haven't posted yet


Whoa, didn't mean to upset you there. It's not my mission to find every single negative out there, I'm just posting what I find.

Sorry.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
detonathor



Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Emperor Xan wrote:
LOL, Jennifer just said that the dude needs to jump into a lake.


Oh dear, I guess I better shut my trap for now..
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Broken Saints Forum Index -> We Haven't Slept in Lifetimes...and our 1000 Eyes are Burning. All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP